Category Archives: Web

Why are registrars allowed to prospect for domains?

I recently saw that mhg.org was available from godaddy for $8800. Does anyone else see the conflict of interest here? The organizations that control the domain registry are also domain prospecting. Do you think they might have a unique advantage over the masses? I do! Shouldn’t their position involve a trust that excludes them from owning domains (other than those needed for their core business)?

related terms:
domain kiting, domain tasting, domain prospecting

Registrars have a uniquely unfair advantage when domain prospecting.

Madhouse’s great big list of important domain extensions

In order of importance to US businesses

.com  –  The gTLD (Generic Top Level Domain ) the park avenue address
.net   –  gTLD originally meant for groups and communities
.org   –  gTLD originally for non-profits and still best-practice to reserve it for that
.us    –  ccTLD (country level domain extension) for United States
.mobi  –  TLD meant for mobile … future prospecting may not end up that important
.biz   –  gTLD meant for Businesses
.pro   –  gTLD (Top Level Domain) for professionals
.co    –  ccTLD for Columbia… or “company
.ws    –  ccTLD for Western Samoa… or “website”
.tv    –  ccTLD for Tuvala… media publishers might move this up to position #2 after .com
.cc    –  ccTLD for Cocos (Keeling) Islands
.info  –  gTLD could be moved up for informational sites
.name   –  gTLD could be moved up for a personal site
.me   –  as in “myself” and “I” (ccTLD for Montenegro)

NOTES:
1)  source: the sometimes foggy brains at mad house graphics
2)  non-profits should move .ORG to the top of the list
3)  list based on importance to US companies

Would you move .CC down? Would you put .CO before .PRO? Have you seen many companies snapping up .CO’s? Is .CO a rising star? Maybe we need to rethink our .CO position 🙂

Privacy Protection through your registrar

If you own a domain you should maintain forwarders (email address aliases) for your addresses in the public domain record and direct them anywhere necessary. People tend to mistakenly sign up for “Privacy Protection” from their registrar because we all value privacy, right? Privacy is a good thing, who wouldn’t embrace it?

However, what most of us really want in regard to our domain registration is protection from spam. We can quickly direct a forwarder anywhere temporarily or permanently, direct it to as many people as needed to keep everyone in the loop, and change it in an instant if it starts getting spam.

I would only recommend the privacy protection to someone who would like to hide their ownership/identity from others. Spam protection is best done with a disposable forwarder.

Open Letter to Godaddy

You need a good usability expert for your public facing website.

The domain manager has improved greatly over the years (albeit somewhat slow). However, getting to the domain manager is a confusing and ever changing experience. Navigation should not be constantly changing depending on where you are in the site and it should only take one click with login to manage my domains.

Sometimes the Domain Manager is in the drop down under “Domains” sometimes it isn’t. Sometimes it is on the left of the dropdown menu, sometimes on the right. Sometimes the domain manager link is in the left column, sometimes you aren’t in the right part of the
site and the domain manager link isn’t there. Sometimes you click the “domain management” link and end up at the page with account alerts… the domain manager link is gone from the left column and has moved to the page’s body. When in the body sometimes it is a text link to the left & top of the table, sometimes it is to the right & top.

I focused my comments on getting to the domain manager, because that is what I need and use the most, but every area of your site should be as clear and succinct as possible.

OK, I took some time to rant because you guys have been great for da house. I’m expecting this will never reach the right people, but if it does and you want anymore feedback feel free to contact us.

Apparently old search engines don’t die

HotBot.com ScreenshotApparently old search engines don’t die, people just stop using them.

Seeing that Cuil.com had gone offline after some of the good work they were doing, and seeing some of the things they are working on at Blekko http://bit.ly/cgDX5E makes me wonder if anyone can truly compete with google’s dominance. It is surprising that so many of the old search engines, who had previously built a name, are still online.